Richard Allender

Male 1767 - 1853  (85 years)


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  • Name Richard Allender  [1
    Born 11 Aug 1767  Frederick, Maryland Find all individuals with events at this location  [2
    Gender Male 
    Residence 1790  Washington, Maryland; transcribed as Richard Allendei, 2 male age 16 and up, 3 male under 16, 3 female Find all individuals with events at this location  [3
    Residence 1800  Upper Antietam Hundred, Washington, Maryland; as Richd Allender, age 16-25, with wife and 2 male under 10 Find all individuals with events at this location  [4
    Residence 1810  Jerusalem and Upper Antietam Hundreds, Washington, Maryland; as Richd Allender; with wife, 1 male under 10, 2 male 10-15, 2 female under 10 Find all individuals with events at this location  [5
    Residence 1820  Williamsburg in Woodberry, Huntington, Pennsylvania; with wife, 1 male under 10, 1 male 10-16, 2 male 16-26, 1 male 45 +, 1 female under 10, 1 female 10-16, 1 female 26-46 Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Residence 1830  Huntingdon, Pennsylvania; as per MRA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    ARVL 1838  Jefferson County, Iowa Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Residence 1840  Jefferson, Ter of Iowa, USA; with Archer Green, Juliana, Baker, and Margaret Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Residence 1850  Lockridge, Jefferson, Iowa Find all individuals with events at this location  [1
    Died 26 May 1853  Salina, Jefferson, Iowa Find all individuals with events at this location  [2
    Buried 28 May 1853  Upper Ridgewoods Cemetery, Iowa Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Notes 
    • Birth, marriage, and death dates from the family Bible are for the family of Richard and Sarah (McCoy) Allender on file at the Fairfield Public Library, Fairfield, Iowa. Of their eight children, two died young, Archebald and Sarah. Their two daughters, Margaret and Juliana, appear not to have had children, although both were married. Margaret married when she was 41 years old. Of the four sons, records for William have not been found past his childhood, for Richard, a tentative history is presented herein, and only for John, the oldest, and Baker, the youngest, are the records established. More current records for the Baker line come through the family tie between myself, Alice Alderman, with my sister-in-law, Odessa Alderman, nee Allender, now deceased ---Feb 10, 2008, AMA.

      The first US Census was taken in 1790 and it shows only one Allender family living in Washington County, Maryland, where the name is given as Richard for the head of household and in addition there is another male over the age of 16, 3 male under 16, and 3 female. Richard would now be 23 years of age, and must be in charge of the household since his father, William (b. 1740), is shown in Harford County, where he is head of the household. No doubt he is there to help settle the affairs of his father, Thomas, who has recently died. (U.S. Censues list only the household heads, 1790-1840)
      On the Census for 1800, Richard is head of hosuhold, shown living at Upper Antietam One Hundred, Washington County, Maryland, with Sarah McCoy, his wife, and two boys under the age of ten: John, b. 1797, and Richard, b. 1799.
      On the census for 1810, he is shown living with Sarah at Jerusalem and Upper Antietam Hundreds, Washington County, with 1 son under 10, William, b. in 1807; 2 sons ages 10-15, John and Richard, now 13 and 11 respectively; and 2 daughters under the age of ten. The daughters would have to be Margaret, b. in 1801, and the newborn Juliana, b. in 1810. By this time he and Sarah have experienced the loss of two of their children, both deaths having occurred in 1808. Archebald, a baby not quite 2 months old died in June and Sarah close to 5 years of age died three months later in early Sept.
      Living 17 places before Richard's family on the 1810 Census is William Allender, who could be his brother. This William is shown with his wife, and five younger family members, and within five places is Maurice Baker (b. 1754) and his wife, the former Mary Allender (daughter of Nicholas and Jane (Day) Allender), and next to Baker is his son Alexander Baker (b. 1782) and his wife with 2 boys under the age of ten.
      On the 1820 Census, Richard and Sarah appear now living in Williamsburg, a small village, in Woodberry, Huntingdon, Pennsylvania. They have a young son, under 10, Baker, b. in 1812; a son, age 10-16, William, age 13; and two sons between 16-26, John and Richard, now 23 and 21 respectively; one daughter under ten, the young Juliana; and a daughter 10-16, who could be Margaret, although she is closer to 18 at this point in time. An unidentified couple is living with them.
      A Census entry for Richard in 1830 has reportedly been found (by MRA, see below) for Richard still living in Huntingdon. He would be 63 years old in 1830, and Sarah is perhaps not well as her death occurs in 1832. It is possible that Richard no longer maintains a household and the couple may be living in the household of others, since the entry (by MRA), if it exists, has not been retrieved by others.
      On 1840 Census, Richard, with his youngest son Baker and his daughter Margaret are shown in the Iowa Territory living with Juliana who married Archer Green in 1836. By the time of the 1850 Census, Richard is 83 years old and is shown living in the household of his youngest son, Baker.

      Kristina ahuja wrote:
      I found this on a web site I belong to, I thought you would find it interesting!
      The common route "west" from Maryland depended upon from what part of Maryland the journey began. Those living on the Eastern Shore and around Baltimore would most likely have taken the northern land route through Pennsylvania. Baltimore to York, Lancaster, and Carlisle, Pennsylvania on the northwestern turnpikes, then west using the Juniata or Kittaning Trails into Westmoreland Co., then on to Pittsburgh and the Ohio River {see the course of U. S. 30 across Pennsylvania}.
      For those migrating from Central or Western Maryland, the journey may have started on the Potomac or the canals which paralleled the Potomac up to Cumberland, Maryland. From there the journey was overland on the Braddock's Road to Fayette Co, Pennsylvania and finally along the National Road to either the Monongahela River or Wheeling, VA and the Ohio River. {follow U. S. 40 through western Maryland and Pennsylvania}.
      Once into western Pennsylvania and VA, there were dozens of routes which the migrants could take into Ohio. These routes including swinging north via wagon roads, or being ferried across or down the Ohio River to other wagons roads. Lots of choices!
      These routes could be followed on horseback, in Conestoga wagons, and even on foot. Some parts could be navigated by boat, but this was rare. Most of the canals and rivers were used for commerce, not migration. Travel times depended upon many factors...total distance, method of transport, weather, and amount of baggage being the critical components. Such a journey could take a few weeks for a single person on a good horse to several months in bad weather with a loaded wagon. I don't suspect there was an average time, but four to six weeks would be an educated guess. My 3rd great grandparents went from near Harrisburg, Pennsylvania to near Wheeling, VA in 1798 in three weeks and a few days.
      The major Pennsylvania migration trails which started as Indian paths and were improved into wagon roads are outlined on the Web link. There were other routes through Virginia, but most of these migrants were heading for Kentucky or Tennessee, not Ohio. Hope this helps

      Title: Letter or card from family member
      Page: from Maude Rock Andrews to RTG April 14, 1980
      Text: "Richard Allender left Maryland, probably Harford Co., in 1812 when Baker Maurice was 6 mos. old. I have located him in Hundingdon (sic) Co. in the 1820 census and I hope in the 1830 census but the name is spelled wrong and the writing is bad. Richard moved his family to Jefferson Co., IA in 1837 and Thomas Allender, his brother, came in 1839 according to the material I have. Where was Thomas between Harford Co., Md. and Jefferson Co. IA? I suppose he must have been some place in Pennsylvania [He was in Bedford County, Pa.] but some of those Allenders went to Ky." --[Averilla, oldest sister to Thomas and Richard, married John Gay Moore in 1785 and moved to Ky. MRA may also have been thinking of the in-law connection of Thomas' wife, Margaret Fore, sister to Elizabeth Fore, whose husband, another Thomas Allender(b. 1773), moved to Ky.]

    Person ID I0021  Maryland Tree
    Last Modified 23 Jul 2008 

    Family Sarah McCoy,   b. 1776, Dublin, Ireland Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 8 Aug 1832, Iowa Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 56 years) 
    Married 14 Jun 1796  Hagerstown (by Rev George Sanucker), Maryland Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Family ID F014  Group Sheet

  • Land Records
    Belmont County OH Land Record 1803
    Belmont County OH Land Record 1803
    Daniel McElheron of Belmont Ohio to John Allender and Richard Allender of Maryland

  • Sources 
    1. [S01800] 1850 United States Federal Census, Ancestry.com, (Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network, Inc., 2005).
      Ancestry.com. 1850 United States Federal Census [database online]. Provo, Utah: MyFamily.com, Inc., 2005. Original data: United States. 1850 United States Federal Census. M432, 1009 rolls. National Archives and Records Administration, Washington D.C. Lockridge, Jefferson, Iowa, roll M432_185, page 33, image 66.

    2. [S02376] OneWorldTreeSM.

    3. [S01736] 1790 United States Federal Census, Ancestry.com, (Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network, Inc., 2000).
      Online publication - Ancestry.com. 1790 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network, Inc., 2000.Original data -
    4. Indexed from: United States of America, Bureau of the Census. Heads of Families at the First Census of the United States in the Year 1790. Washington, D.C.: Government Printing Office, 1908.
    5. Imaged from: National Archives and Records Administration. First Census of the United States, 1790. M637, RG 29, 12 rolls. National Archives and Records Administration, Washington, D.C.
    6. . , Washington, Maryland, roll M637_3, page , image 0382.

    7. [S01743] 1800 United States Federal Census, Ancestry.com, (Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network, Inc., 2004).
      Online publication - Ancestry.com. 1800 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network, Inc., 2004.Original data - United States of America, Bureau of the Census. Second Census of the United States, 1800. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1800.M32, 52 rolls. Upper Antietam Hundred, Washington, Maryland, roll 12, page 600, image 125.

    8. [S49762] 1810 United States Federal Census, Ancestry.com, (Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network, Inc., 2004).
      Online publication - Ancestry.com. 1810 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network, Inc., 2004.Original data - United States of America, Bureau of the Census. Third Census of the United States, 1810. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1810.M252, 71 rolls. Jerusalem and Upper Antietam Hundreds, Washington, Maryland, roll 16, page 426, image 184.00.